Sugar syrups are basic to the bakery and dessert trades.  Sugar is dissolved and cooked in water to create syrup.  Flavors, colors, and sometimes juices are added to make finished syrups.  These are used for dessert sauces and syrups, ice cream toppings, beverage syrups, and pancake syrups.

Many candies are made the same way; the syrup is just cooked to a soft ball or hard ball stage to make candy.

Using that knowledge, we used pancake syrup to make absolutely delightful candy popcorn.   Now we wondered if we could use syrup to make pudding.  If we could use it for pudding, then we can make pie filling with pancake syrup.  Intriguing.

So we started off to make puddings with three different kinds of syrup:

  • Buttermilk syrup.  This is scrumptious.  It has a dairy base.  The acid in the buttermilk has been neutralized to make a very creamy, caramel syrup.  It’s easy to picture transforming that into pudding.  Mixes come in four flavors: Old Fashioned, Coconut, Maple, and Cinnamon.

These were scrumptious.

  • Lawford Private Reserve Cream Syrups.  Since these are made with cream, it’s easy to picture these as a pudding.  They come in Cinnamon, Vanilla, Coconut, and Maple flavors.

These were scrumptious.

  • Water based pancake syrup.  We used a lemon syrup for this trial.  If it worked with lemon it should work with boysenberry or apricot.

These were marginal.  We’re not ready to give this up.  We need to do so more testing.

Pudding Made with Buttermilk Syrup

 

We made absolutely scrumptious pudding with our buttermilk syrups.   The Old Fashioned Buttermilk Syrup was very good but I think I liked the coconut even better.  Folks loved the maple.  We did not make cinnamon.

 

Here is the recipe:

1 buttermilk syrup mix to make three cups syrup
1/3 cup cornstarch
8 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
3 cups milk
4 large egg yolks

 

 

  1. Empty the mix into a medium bowl. Stir the cornstarch into the mix.
  2. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the milk and cream.
  3. In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Remove the pan from the heat and add the cream mixture and the mix. Stir.
  4. Place the pan back on the heat and cook until boiling, stirring with a whisk. Remove from the heat and continue stirring until the bubbles subside.
  5. Scrape the pudding into a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap pressed down onto the surface of the pudding so that it does not form a crust and refrigerate.

Pudding Made with Cream Syrup

 

We love our cream syrups and sell a ton of them.  Most of it goes on pancakes and waffles.   Surprisingly, the best seller is the coconut cream syrup.  I know the local customers use it on our pineapple pancakes and our Mayan chocolate pancakes.

I love the coconut cream syrup as a dip for strawberries and as a dressing for cut fruit salads.

Here is the recipe:

one 11.5 ounce jar Lawford’s Private Reserve Cream Syrup, or equal (coconut, vanilla, cinnamon, or maple)
1/3 cup cornstarch
8 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups milk
4 large egg yolks

  1. Empty the mix into a medium bowl. Stir the cornstarch into the mix.
  2. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the milk and cream.
  3. In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Remove the pan from the heat and add the cream mixture and the mix. Stir.
  4. Place the pan back on the heat and cook until boiling, stirring with a whisk. Remove from the heat and continue stirring until the bubbles subside.
  5. Scrape the pudding into a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap pressed down onto the surface of the pudding so that it does not form a crust and refrigerate.

Pudding Made with Water Based Syrup

We were skeptical that we could make pudding out of water, a water based syrup, but we tried.  We used lemon syrup made from our Lemon Pancake and Dessert Syrup Mix.  Surprisingly, the pudding was rich and smooth.  But it lacked flavor.  I expected the smooth, intense flavor of the syrup but it was mostly gone, cooked out.

We added 3/4 teaspoon lemon extract.  It had enough flavor but it still wasn’t quite right.

I wondered why the lemon flavor cooked out but the other syrups did not.  Flavors are complex and fragile and often don’t hold up to heat well.  I remember a company representative, one of our suppliers, tell me that some of their flavors have up to 248 components.

It’s worth trying again to see if other flavors hold up better.  If you would like to try, here is the recipe:

1 lemon syrup mix to make three cups syrup
1/3 cup cornstarch
8 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
3 cups milk
4 large egg yolks

  1. Empty the mix into a medium bowl. Stir the cornstarch into the mix.
  2. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the milk and cream.
  3. In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Remove the pan from the heat and add the cream mixture and the mix. Stir.
  4. Place the pan back on the heat and cook until boiling, stirring with a whisk. Remove from the heat and continue stirring until the bubbles subside.
  5. Scrape the pudding into a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap pressed down onto the surface of the pudding so that it does not form a crust and refrigerate.